Sep 072017
 
Thanks to the author below from whom I … well, I just didn’t want to misplace it ..

Windows 10’s Bash shell doesn’t officially support graphical Linux desktop applications. Microsoft says this feature is designed only for developers who want to run Linux terminal utilities. But the underlying “Windows Subsystem for Linux” is more powerful than Microsoft lets on.

It is possible to run graphical Linux applications in Windows 10, but bear in mind that it isn’t officially supported. Not every piece of Linux software works, and graphical applications are even more complex and less tested. But these should become more stable over time as Microsoft improves the underlying Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Windows 10’s Bash shell only supports 64-bit binaries, so you can’t install and run 32-bit Linux software.

How This Works

First, let’s run down exactly how this works so you can have some understanding of what we’re doing here.

Windows 10 includes an underlying “Windows Subsystem for Linux” that allows Windows 10 to run Linux software by translating Linux system calls to Windows system calls.

When you run the bash.exe program, it downloads and installs a complete Ubuntu user space image on your computer. This includes the exact same binaries–or applications–that would run on Ubuntu. That “Bash on Ubuntu on Windows” environment works thanks to the underlying Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Microsoft doesn’t want to spend any time working on graphical software, as this feature is intended for command-line developer tools. But the main technical reason that graphical applications aren’t supported is that they require an “X server” to provide that graphical interface. On a typical Linux desktop, that “X server” automatically appears when you boot your computer and it renders the entire desktop and the applications you use.

But try opening a graphical application from Bash on Windows, though, and it will complain that it can’t open a display.

There are X server applications you can install on a Windows desktop, however. Typically, these are used to render Linux applications running on other computers–the “X11” protocol is rather old and was designed with the ability run over a network connection.

If you install an X server application on your Windows desktop and change a setting in the Bash shell, applications will send their graphical output to the X server application and they’ll appear on your Windows desktop. Everything should work fine, assuming those applications don’t depend on Linux system calls that the Windows Subsystem for Linux doesn’t yet support.

Step One: Install an X Server

There are several different X servers you could install on Windows, but we recommend Xming. Download it and install it on your Windows 10 PC.

The installation process is simple: You can just accept the default settings. It will then automatically launch and run in your system tray, waiting for you to run graphical programs.

Step Two: Install the Program

You can install graphical Linux desktop programs like you can any other program, using the apt-get command in the Ubuntu-based Bash environment. For example, let’s say you’d want to install the graphical, GTK-based vim editor. You’d run the following command in the Bash window:

sudo apt-get install vim-gtk

It will go through the installation process in the command line window, just like it does on Ubuntu.

Step Three: Set Your Display Environment Variable

Now, you’ll need to set the “DISPLAY” environment variable to point at the X server running on your Windows 10 PC. If you don’t do this, graphical applications will simply fail to launch.

To do this, run the following command in the Bash environment:

export DISPLAY=:0

This setting only applies to your current Bash session. If you close the window, Bash will forget it. You’ll have to run this command each time you reopen Bash and want to run a graphical application.

Step Four: Launch an Application

You can now just launch a graphical application by typing the name of its executable, like you’d type any other command. For example, to launch vim-gtk, you’d run:

gvim

It’s that simple. If the application crashes after launching, the Linux system calls it requires may not be supported by the Windows Subsystem for Linux. There’s not much you can do about this. But give it a shot, and you may find that the apps you need work decently well!

You can also combine the third and fourth steps, if you like. Rather than exporting the DISPLAY variable once for an entire Bash shell session, you’d just run a graphical application with the following command:

DISPLAY=:0 command

For example, to launch gvim, you’d run:

DISPLAY=:0 gvim

Remember, this isn’t officially supported, so you may run into errors with more complex applications. A virtual machine is a more reliable solution for running many graphical Linux desktop applications on Windows 10, but this is a neat solution for some of the simpler stuff.

How to manually download and install Windows 10 cumulative updates | Windows Central

 Windows tips  Comments Off on How to manually download and install Windows 10 cumulative updates | Windows Central
Aug 122017
 

When a new Windows 10 update isn’t showing up, use this guide to download and install cumulative updates manually.

Microsoft makes available updates for Windows 10 in the regular basis to patch any security hole and to improve the functionality of the operating system. However, even now that updates are mandatory to keep devices always up to date, sometimes updates may not appear for download on your computer for a long time.

Although Windows Update is the preferred method to get updates, Microsoft also allows users to manually download new patches as they become available through the “Microsoft Update Catalog” website. While mainly a resource for IT administrators who need to test updates before pushing them to devices in their network, you can use the Update Catalog to quickly download a new update if it’s not showing for you in Windows Update as an alternative option.

In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through the steps to find, download, and install updates manually on your device.

How to download cumulative updates

It’s important to note that the Microsoft Update Catalog doesn’t list anything, instead it’s a search page, where you must know exactly the update you want to download.

The easiest way to find an update is knowing its Knowledge Base reference number. For example, on October 11th, Microsoft released Windows 10 build 14393.321, which Knowledge Base reference was KB3194798. You can find the references when we publish a new article about a new update, or when you visit the Windows 10 Update History website. Then do the following:

  1. Visit the Microsoft Update Catalog website.

    Quick Tip: If you can’t access the site using Microsoft Edge, you can also try opening a new InPrivate window, which should let you get through.

  2. Do a search for the update using the KB number for the update you want. For example, KB3194798.

Source: How to manually download and install Windows 10 cumulative updates | Windows Central

Sep 162009
 

I came across a decent blog post about formatting a flash drive to install windows vista/7 etc from. Thanks to Kevin’s Blog. for this info. I have completed all the steps on my 8G generic-ish drive and will copy the OS files over now.. Thanks!

Required:

  • USB Flash Drive (4GB+)
  • Microsoft OS Disk (Vista / Windows 7)
  • A computer running Vista / Windows 7

Step 1: Format the Drive
The steps here are to use the command line to format the disk properly using the diskpart utility. [Be warned: this will erase everything on your drive. Be careful.]

  1. Plug in your USB Flash Drive
  2. Open a command prompt as administrator (Right click on Start > All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt and select “Run as administrator”
  3. Find the drive number of your USB Drive by typing the following into the Command Prompt window:
    diskpart
    list disk

    The number of your USB drive will listed. You’ll need this for the next step.  I’ll assume that the USB flash drive is disk 1.
  4. Format the drive by typing the next instructions into the same window. Replace the number “1” with the number of your disk below.
    select disk 1
    clean
    create partition primary
    select partition 1
    active
    format fs=NTFS
    assign
    exit
    When that is done you’ll have a formatted USB flash drive ready to be made bootable.

Step 2: Make the Drive Bootable
Next we’ll use the bootsect utility that comes on the Vista or Windows 7 disk to make the flash drive bootable.  In the same command window that you were using in Step 1:

  1. Insert your Windows Vista / 7 DVD into your drive.
  2. Change directory to the DVD’s boot directory where bootsect lives:
    d:
    cd d:\boot
  3. Use bootsect to set the USB as a bootable NTFS drive prepared for a Vista/7 image. I’m assuming that your USB flash drive has been labeled disk G:\ by the computer:
    bootsect /nt60 g:
  4. You can now close the command prompt window, we’re done here.

Step 3: Copy the installation DVD to the USB drive
The easiest way is to use Windows explorer to copy all of the files on your DVD on to the formatted flash drive.  After you’ve copied all of the files the disk you are ready to go.

Step 4: Set your BIOS to boot from USB